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BS in Computer Scienceon-campus

Practical skills and universal knowledge

Today’s society is increasingly information-based. Fundamental knowledge of how computers and computing systems work is a vital part of modern life and a universal skill that can be applied to a variety of careers and fields.

Our computer science program will prepare you for success by providing comprehensive knowledge of the discipline and by teaching you how to think clearly, precisely, and creatively.


Program outcomes

Graduates of the BS in Computer Science will be prepared to take on a variety of careers, including:

  • computer programming
  • software engineering
  • database administration
  • mobile application development
  • web development
  • IT/help desk
  • network administration
  • user interface development

Get started by contacting Pedro

Pedro Ugalde, admissions counselorPedro Ugalde is this program’s admissions counselor for US students. Pedro will provide you with all the details of becoming a student, including connecting you with the program director or faculty.

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International applicants may connect with us through our international inquiry form.


Next entry: Aug 2024Apply to MIU >Next entry: Aug 2024Apply to MIU >

Courses may include

    This course provides a focused program for enhancing programming and analytical skills in five areas: problem-solving, data structures, object-oriented programming, the Java programming language, and the use of recursion in Java programs. These topics are of particular importance as a prerequisite for the courses in the graduate program in Computer Science. Topics include: elements of Java programming, object-oriented design and implementation, data structures (including lists, stacks, queues, binary search trees, hash tables, and sets), the exception hierarchy, file i/o and streams, and JDBC. (4 credits)
    This course presents the fundamental principles of object-oriented programming. Students will learn how to write reusable and better-maintained software, and integrate this knowledge with laboratory assignments and projects. Topics include: fundamental principles and models of object-oriented programming, UML class diagrams and design principles that promote reusability and maintainability of software.
    Database systems organize and retrieve information, allowing the user to access the desired information easily and efficiently. Topics include relational data model; SQL; ER modeling; relational algebra; data normalization; transactions; objects in the database; data security and integrity; data warehousing, OLAP, and data mining; distributed databases; and study of a specific commercial database system.
    This course introduces the student to best practices in software development through a software development methodology. Students will learn how to bring together their skills in object-oriented analysis and design, in the use of UML diagrams for modeling software solutions, to produce robust, easily maintainable software. A software development methodology describes when and how object-oriented concepts and UML diagrams should be used to accomplish the aim of building quality software. The course centers on a small project in which the principles discussed in the lecture format can be illustrated and applied. By the end of the course, the student will have a running application, built in accord with the high standards of a contemporary development methodology. (4 credits)
    In this course students create an original software project from the ground up from the initial analysis and design phases through implementation and testing. Students are expected to submit several project proposals before the start of the course and submit a written project postmortem at the end of the course. With Faculty approval this course can be extended to two months to facilitate a larger project.
    Calculus, one of the most useful areas of mathematics, is the study of continuous change. It provides the language and concepts used by modern science to quantify the laws of nature and the numerical techniques through which this knowledge is applied to enrich daily life. Students gain a clear understanding of the fundamental principles of calculus and how they are applied in real-world situations. Topics include: techniques of integration, further applications of derivatives, and applications of integration.
    Calculus, one of the most useful areas of mathematics, is the study of continuous change. It provides the language and concepts used by modern science to quantify the laws of nature and the numerical techniques through which this knowledge is applied to enrich daily life. Students gain a clear understanding of the fundamental principles of calculus and how they are applied in real-world situations. Topics include: techniques of integration, further applications of derivatives, and applications of integration.
    Calculus, one of the most useful areas of mathematics, is the study of continuous change. It provides the language and concepts used by modern science to quantify the laws of nature and the numerical techniques through which this knowledge is applied to enrich daily life. Using computers for visualization, students gain a clear understanding of the fundamental principles of calculus and how they are applied in real-world situations. Topics include infinite series, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, the chain rule, multiple integrals, change of variables.
    Linear algebra is the study of linearity, the simplest form of quantitative relationship, and provides a basis for the study of many areas of pure and applied mathematics, as well as key applications in the physical, biological, and social sciences. Topics include systems of linear equations, vector equations, matrices, the vector space Rn together with its bases, linear transformations, and eigenvectors and eigenvalues.
    Discrete mathematics, the mathematical study of finite processes and discrete phenomena, is essential for computer science. Topics include: logic and sets, relations and functions, vertex-edge graphs, recursion, and combinatorics. (Same as CS 272)
    Probability provides precise descriptions of the laws underlying random events, with applications in quantum physics, statistics, computer science, and control theory. Topics include: permutations and combinations, axiomatic definition of probability, conditional probability, random variables, discrete and continuous distributions, expectation and variance, and the central limit theorem.
    This course introduces the fundamental concepts related to computer programming, preparing students with the skills to write basic computer programs, and the knowledge to understand basic programs written by others. Topics include built-in data types, flow control using conditionals and loops, arrays, console I/O, recursion, using libraries, and using classes to create their own data types.
    This course covers programming in Java, specifically focusing on object-oriented concepts and creating GUI applications. Topics include: classes and objects, primitives and references, inheritance and polymorphism, interfaces and abstract classes, exception handling, GUI programming in Swing, and serialization and file I/O.
    Students use computer programming laboratory problems to apply the principles of data structure organization in a practical environment and develop advanced programming skills. The organizing power of knowledge is found to be the source of order in computer data structures. Topics include: abstract data types, internal representation of data, stacks, queues, linked lists, hash maps, binary trees, heaps, red-black trees, 3-4 trees and B trees. (4 credits)
    Students are introduced to the study algorithms. Topics include: searching and sorting algorithms, computing time of programs and representations and algorithms for graphs. This course also includes a significant research paper around the efficiencies and running times of different algorithms (4 credits)
    This course presents the internal structure of a computer, an introduction to assembly language, and the design of digital logic circuits and their use in structuring the various functional components of a computer, such as the memory and central processing unit. Topics include: machine organization, logic gates, circuits, machine language, assembly language, memory, I/O systems, and how these all combine to create typical and atypical architectures. (4 credits)
    This course covers languages, tools, and technologies for developing interactive and dynamic web sites. Topics and technologies include HTTP, HTML, CSS, client and server-side programming, database interactions, web security, and Ajax technologies. (4 credits)

Degree requirements

A minimum of 128 credits (semester hours) is required for students to graduate with a bachelor’s degree. This may include up to 90 transfer credits.

Undergraduate degree students can apply transfer credits to cover electives, some general education requirements, and up to half the course work in the major, for a maximum of 90 total credits. General transfer credits are accepted for courses completed with a grade of “C” or higher.

To graduate with a bachelor’s degree, students must satisfy the following general education requirements:

    This course introduces students to three fundamental sources of knowledge that can be used together to evaluate any idea: personal experience, scientific reasoning, and traditional wisdom. On the basis of evidence from all three sources, a new consciousness-based framework is introduced as a new way of viewing the world and addressing its challenges.
    The course will explore the new paradigm in science that the “Physiology is Consciousness.” Current concepts of mind and body will be understood in terms of this new paradigm. This course will present our facts of brain structure and function in light of Maharishi Vedic Science and the discovery of Veda and the Vedic Literature in human physiology done by Tony Nader, MD, PhD. We will examine how our brain constructs reality at every moment and how the experience of unboundedness – the Self of every individual – can transform our physiology and awaken the total creative potential of the brain in enlightenment, which is the birthright of every human being.
    This course gives a deep and non-mathematical understanding of the differences between classical and quantum physics. It explains the meaning and mechanics of unification and symmetry, and the main concepts of unified quantum field theories and superstring theory. It shows that at the basis of the universe lies a completely unified field, a self- interacting entity from which all particles and forces arise through the process of spontaneous symmetry breaking. The course gives students experience and understanding of the interconnectedness between the laws of physics, the universe, and themselves.

Featured Alumni

alumnus-vikas-narulaVikas Narula, a graduate of our BS in Computer Science, is the owner and founder of Keyhubs, a Minneapolis-based management software and consulting firm that uncovers a company’s “hidden organization” — the informal network of relationships between workers that shows how work actually gets done.

“To me, entrepreneurship is about more than making money,” says Vikas, “It’s really a spiritual journey, a journey of self-discovery and growth. MIU taught me that. MIU gave me a perspective on life that helped me see things beyond the material. It helped me understand what matters most.”

Cost & Aid, 2024-25

    US On-Campus Undergraduate

    This estimate is based on one year for a typical on-campus Federal Pell Grant recipient (represents 80% of our onsite undergraduates). File your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and then contact our financial aid office for questions on variables.

    Annual Cost and Typical Financial Aid
    Tuition and fees$16,530
    Housing (single room) and meals$7,400
    Grants and Scholarship (typical)-$14,400
    Net cost per year$9,530
    Federal student loans-$9,530
    Your payment$0

    Additional Financial Aid Information

      $2,400 Federal Work Study is available toward your estimated $4,800 out of pocket costs.
      Scholarship from MIU described above consists of the Federal Pell Grant and the Federal Supplemental Education Grant and is based on (1) full-time enrollment and (2) financial need based on expected FAFSA outcome.
      Repayment begins after your enrollment ends. Unique repayment plans are available such as income-based, Public Service Loan Forgiveness, and deferments based on low income or unemployment.

      There are a variety of money-saving tax benefits to assist in reducing the cost of education expenses. More about education tax benefits.
      Veterans should contact the VA for information on Veterans Education Benefits. Veterans eligible for BAH monthly benefits: The VA utilizes a scale of credits per block of courses; therefore, the VA sometimes pays part-time benefits for an individual month while the university delivers full-time federal aid for an entire semester. Our Veterans Certifying Official is our Director of Financial Aid.

    Loan Repayment Options

      Payments are a fixed amount that ensures your loans are paid off within 10 years (within 10 to 30 years for Consolidation Loans).
      Payments may be fixed or graduated and will ensure that your loans are paid off within 25 years.
      Payments are lower at first and then increase, usually every two years, and are for an amount that will ensure your loans are paid off within 10 years (within 10 to 30 years for Consolidation Loans).
      Your monthly payments will be either 10 or 15 percent of discretionary income (depending on when you received your first loans), but never more than you would have paid under the 10-year Standard Repayment Plan.
      Payments are recalculated each year and are based on your updated income, family size, and the total amount of your Direct Loans. Any outstanding balance will be forgiven if you haven’t repaid your loan in full after 25 years.
      Your monthly payment is based on annual income, but your loan will be paid in full within 15 years.

    Tuition, other fees, scholarships, and financial policies are subject to change prior to the entry date. For more information, contact us at finaid@miu.edu for a quick reply — normally one business day — or see more about financial aid.

    International On-Campus Undergraduate

    Annual Cost and Typical Financial Aid
    Tuition and fees$16,530
    Housing (single room) and meals$7,400
    Health insurance (estimate)$1,992
    Personal expenses, books, unexpected needs (estimate)$3,500
    Cost Per Year$29,422

    Full-time students may apply for up to $6,000 scholarship based on qualifying level of documented family income. Our undergraduate scholarship application form will be available upon application to the university.


    Tuition, other fees, scholarships, and financial policies are subject to change prior to the entry date.

Featured faculty

professor-michael-zijlstra

  • Michael Zijlstra has worked as a Corporate Trainer in OO analysis and design, and was the Software Architect for several successful enterprise applications.
  • His current interests include domain modeling with OO persistence, and alternatives to relational databases such as NoSQL.

All Department Faculty

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